Classes

    American Capitalism (Gen Ed 1159)

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    What is capitalism and how has it unfolded in American history?

     

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    Sven Beckert

    How did capitalism emerge, expand and transform daily life in North America over the past 500 years? In this course, students will gain an in-depth understanding of how North America turned from a minor outpost of the Atlantic economy into the powerhouse of the world economy, how Americans built a capitalist economy and how that capitalism, in turn, changed every aspect of their lives.... Read more about American Capitalism (Gen Ed 1159)

    Race and Caste (Gen Ed 1126)

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    What can thinking about race and caste together tell us about identity and inequality?

     

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    Ajantha Subramanian

    Race and caste are two of the most enduring forms of social stratification. While their histories date well before the advent of political democracy, they have taken on new forms in the context of democratic social transformation and capitalist development. In this course, we will grapple with the meanings, uses, and politics of race and caste historically and in the contemporary moment.... Read more about Race and Caste (Gen Ed 1126)

    Americans as Occupiers and Nation Builders (Gen Ed 1017)

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    How have perceptions of racial difference shaped US military occupations abroad, such as the Philippines, Japan, and most recently Afghanistan and Iraq?

     

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    Andrew Gordon and Erez Manela

    The United States has launched numerous projects of military occupation and nation-building in foreign lands since the late 19th century. These have been contradictory enterprises, carrying ideals of freedom and self-determination "offered" by force or by fiat.... Read more about Americans as Occupiers and Nation Builders (Gen Ed 1017)

    The Crusades and the Making of East and West (Gen Ed 1088)

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    How did we come to think of the world as split into East and West?

     

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    Dimiter Angelov

    The course explores the birth of the civilizational categories of East and West during the era of the Crusades, one of the most significant and deeply symbolic events in human history. A series of wars in the Middle Ages fought between Latin Christians and the perceived enemies of Christendom, the Crusades saw the first experiments of European colonization, the rise of Western commercial capitalism, and the emergence of new cultural identities and boundaries across Europe and the Mediterranean.... Read more about The Crusades and the Making of East and West (Gen Ed 1088)

    Law, Politics, and Trade Policy: Lessons from East Asia (Gen Ed 1119)

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    Must the East Asian Growth Miracle always lead to trade wars or can international law bring cooperation?

     

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    Christina Davis

    How do states balance the challenges and opportunities of international markets? Importing ideas and resources while exporting manufactured goods underlies the East Asian growth miracle but also builds conflict with other governments. This course examines the transformative role of trade policy for Japan, Korea, and China. From the “unequal treaties” of the nineteenth century to the World Trade Organization today, trade law binds the interactions between East Asia and the world.... Read more about Law, Politics, and Trade Policy: Lessons from East Asia (Gen Ed 1119)

    The Holocaust (Gen Ed 1118)

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    How could the Holocaust have happened/how did it happen?

     

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    Kevin Madigan

    Photograph of menorah and swastika

    Who is responsible for genocide? Through the lens of the Holocaust – perhaps the most-studied genocide of the modern era – we will grapple with the issues of good and evil, blame and responsibility, duty and dissent as they pertain to violence enacted at the personal and state levels.... Read more about The Holocaust (Gen Ed 1118)

    The Celts: People or Construct? (Gen Ed 1081)

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    Who and what define an ethnic group?

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    Catherine McKenna

    We are exposed every day to terms referring to ethnic groups, and we tend to accept these terms uncritically, assuming that we know what they mean and to whom they refer. These labels help to shape our sense of ourselves, of others, and of ourselves in relation to others. Yet the ethnic identities associated with such terms are in fact ambiguous and malleable, constructed of a shifting array of elements, including genetics, shared history, language, religion, economy, political institutions, music, architecture, and foodways.... Read more about The Celts: People or Construct? (Gen Ed 1081)

    The United States and China (Gen Ed 1068)

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    Are the United States and China destined for conflict or can they lead the world in addressing common challenges?

     

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    William C. Kirby

    The United States and China are global economic and military powers. They have a rich history of commerce, friendship, alliance, and antagonism. Both countries have been shaped and re-shaped by the nature of their mutual relations. Their relationship is in crisis, the outcome of which will do much to define the world of the 21st century.... Read more about The United States and China (Gen Ed 1068)