Classes

    Understanding Darwinism (Gen Ed 1004)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Histories, Societies, Individuals icon with textScience & Technology in Society icon with text

    Janet Browne and Andrew Berry

    How does scientific knowledge develop, how is it shaped by history, and what effect does it have on society? An interdisciplinary exploration of Darwin's ideas and their impact on science and society, this course links the history of Darwin's ideas with the key features of modern evolutionary biology. We review the development of the main elements of the theory of evolution, highlighting the areas in which Darwin's ideas have proved remarkably robust and areas in which subsequent developments have significantly modified the theory.... Read more about Understanding Darwinism (Gen Ed 1004)

    Why Is There No Cure for Health? (Gen Ed 1079)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Science & Technology in Society icon with text

    David M. Cutler

    Around the world, billions of dollars are spent on health care treatments, public health initiatives, and pharmaceutical research and development. So why are we still not able to prevent preventable diseases, provide affordable healthcare for millions of people, and deliver cures for curable diseases? And what are the best ways to address these issues? Because these questions are so large, we will focus our discussion around questions like: What steps should be taken to end HIV/AIDS? How should the United States reform its health care system? And how should prescription drugs be produced and sold?... Read more about Why Is There No Cure for Health? (Gen Ed 1079)

    Anime as Global Popular Culture (Gen Ed 1042)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Aesthetics & Culture icon with text

    Tomiko Yoda

    Banner of anime images

    In this course, students will learn to engage Japanese or Japanese-style animation (sometimes known as anime) through two-pronged approaches. First, the students will learn to evaluate the aesthetic and socio-cultural relevance of anime in relation to the criteria and perspectives developed through the study of more established artistic forms such literature, cinema and visual arts. We will cover topics including, anime’s generic conventions, formal aesthetic, and narrative motifs.... Read more about Anime as Global Popular Culture (Gen Ed 1042)

    Black Radicalism (Gen Ed 1016)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Aesthetics & Culture icon with text

    Robert Reid-Pharr

    “Black Radicalism” is a course designed to introduce students to the main currents of black radical thought in the period stretching from the close of World War II until roughly 1980 and the advent of the Reagan Era.  The course will be divided into three sections: Anti-Colonialism; Black Nationalism; and Black Feminism and will focus on key works of fiction, theory, and criticism by especially prominent black intellectuals including Frantz Fanon (The Wretched of the Earth); Richard Wright (White Man Listen!); George Jackson (Soledad Brother); Huey Newton (Revolutionary Suicide); Angela Davis (If They Come for Me in the Morning); and the members of the Combahee River Collective (The Combahee River Statement).... Read more about Black Radicalism (Gen Ed 1016)

    Stories from the End of the World (Gen Ed 1001)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Aesthetics & Culture icon with text

    Giovanni Bazzana

    Fantasizing about the end of the world is something that many people in the US do on a daily basis either by watching their favorite shows on TV, by playing videogames, or by listening to political speeches. This course will start from this observation to ask why imagining the end is so pervasive in our culture and to analyze critically where these images are coming from and how they are used in contemporary conversations.... Read more about Stories from the End of the World (Gen Ed 1001)

    Power and Civilization: China (Gen Ed 1136)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Histories, Societies, Individuals icon with text

    William C. Kirby and Peter K. Bol

    How is a civilization built and sustained over millennia?  How are political systems supported or undermined by cultural, economic, and ecological challenges?  How does the need for shared values in a nation compete with individual interest and creativity?

    These concepts are common to humankind, but nowhere on Earth are they more in evidence than in the story of the longest, continuous civilization in human history, China, home to one-fifth of mankind.... Read more about Power and Civilization: China (Gen Ed 1136)

    Wakanda Revisited: African Spirituality in Ancient and Modern Times (Gen Ed 1071)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Histories, Societies, Individuals icon with text

    Jacob K. Olupona

    Taking the Marvel blockbuster “Black Panther” as a starting point, the course will explore the African spiritual heritage both on the continent and the diaspora communities (Black Atlantic diasporas). We will begin by spelling out the features of African indigenous religious traditions: cosmology, cosmogony, mythology, ritual practices, divination, healing ceremonies, sacred kingship, etc.... Read more about Wakanda Revisited: African Spirituality in Ancient and Modern Times (Gen Ed 1071)

    Medicine and Conflict: The History and Ethics of Healing in Political Turmoil (Gen Ed 1150)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Ethics & Civics icon with text

    Soha Bayoumi

    “War is the only proper school for surgeons,” the Ancient Greek physician, Hippocrates, is quoted to have said. This saying has been used to show how medicine and war have been thought for millennia to shape each. Medicine has played a major role in situations of political conflict, ever since human societies engaged in war and started elaborating “just war doctrines,” that determine how belligerent parties should conduct war, as an attempt to “civilize” war and mitigate its scourges.... Read more about Medicine and Conflict: The History and Ethics of Healing in Political Turmoil (Gen Ed 1150)

    The Climate-Energy Challenge (Gen Ed 1094)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Science & Technology in Society icon with text

    Daniel Schrag

    This course will examine future climate change in the context of Earth history, and then consider various strategies for what might be done to deal with it. The likely impacts of continued greenhouse gas emissions will be explored, emphasizing the scientific uncertainties associated with various predictions, and how this can be understood in the context of risk.... Read more about The Climate-Energy Challenge (Gen Ed 1094)

    The Science of Happiness (Gen Ed 1154)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Science & Technology in Society icon with text

    Jason P. Mitchell

    Recent research in the cognitive sciences—especially psychology, economics, and neuroscience—has begun to examine the factors that promote personal well-being and happiness. One surprising, but consistent, observation has been that many of the things that are widely believed to be crucial for our happiness—wealth, material possessions, “not missing out”, even good grades—not only fail to make many people happy but can actively undermine the sense of well-being.... Read more about The Science of Happiness (Gen Ed 1154)

    Literatures of Decolonization (Gen Ed 1155)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Aesthetics & Culture icon with text

    Annette Damayanti Lienau

    The first Asia-Africa conference of newly independent states (held in Indonesia in 1955) was hailed by contemporary observers as an event as significant as the European renaissance in global importance.  It inspired a sequence of political and cultural initiatives (including several African-Asian writers’ conferences) in pursuit of new forms of cultural exchange and political brokering unmediated by former colonial centers.... Read more about Literatures of Decolonization (Gen Ed 1155)

    Faith and Authenticity: Religion, Existentialism and the Human Condition (Gen Ed 1069)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Aesthetics & Culture icon with text

    Courtney Bickel Lamberth, David Lamberth, and Cornel West

    This course engages some of the most fundamental questions of human existence through the philosophical, theological and literary works of 19th and 20th century authors many of whom are associated with the movement called “existentialism.” What is an authentic individual life?... Read more about Faith and Authenticity: Religion, Existentialism and the Human Condition (Gen Ed 1069)

    Contemporary Developing Countries: Entrepreneurial Solutions to Intractable Problems (Gen Ed 1011)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

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    Tarun Khanna and Satchit Balsari

    What problems do developing countries face, and how can individuals contribute to solutions rather than awaiting the largesse of the state or other actors? Intractable problems – such as lack of access to education and healthcare, forced reliance on contaminated food, deep-seated corruption – are part of the quotidian existence of the vast majority of five of the world’s seven billion people.... Read more about Contemporary Developing Countries: Entrepreneurial Solutions to Intractable Problems (Gen Ed 1011)

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