Classes

    Understanding Darwinism (Gen Ed 1004)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Histories, Societies, Individuals icon with textScience & Technology in Society icon with text

    Janet Browne and Andrew Berry

    How does scientific knowledge develop, how is it shaped by history, and what effect does it have on society? An interdisciplinary exploration of Darwin's ideas and their impact on science and society, this course links the history of Darwin's ideas with the key features of modern evolutionary biology. We review the development of the main elements of the theory of evolution, highlighting the areas in which Darwin's ideas have proved remarkably robust and areas in which subsequent developments have significantly modified the theory.... Read more about Understanding Darwinism (Gen Ed 1004)

    Black Radicalism (Gen Ed 1016)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Aesthetics & Culture icon with text

    Robert Reid-Pharr

    “Black Radicalism” is a course designed to introduce students to the main currents of black radical thought in the period stretching from the close of World War II until roughly 1980 and the advent of the Reagan Era.  The course will be divided into three sections: Anti-Colonialism; Black Nationalism; and Black Feminism and will focus on key works of fiction, theory, and criticism by especially prominent black intellectuals including Frantz Fanon (The Wretched of the Earth); Richard Wright (White Man Listen!); George Jackson (Soledad Brother); Huey Newton (Revolutionary Suicide); Angela Davis (If They Come for Me in the Morning); and the members of the Combahee River Collective (The Combahee River Statement).... Read more about Black Radicalism (Gen Ed 1016)

    The Science of Happiness (Gen Ed 1154)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Science & Technology in Society icon with text

    Jason P. Mitchell

    Recent research in the cognitive sciences—especially psychology, economics, and neuroscience—has begun to examine the factors that promote personal well-being and happiness. One surprising, but consistent, observation has been that many of the things that are widely believed to be crucial for our happiness—wealth, material possessions, “not missing out”, even good grades—not only fail to make many people happy but can actively undermine the sense of well-being.... Read more about The Science of Happiness (Gen Ed 1154)

    Faith and Authenticity: Religion, Existentialism and the Human Condition (Gen Ed 1069)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Aesthetics & Culture icon with text

    Courtney Bickel Lamberth, David Lamberth, and Cornel West

    This course engages some of the most fundamental questions of human existence through the philosophical, theological and literary works of 19th and 20th century authors many of whom are associated with the movement called “existentialism.” What is an authentic individual life?... Read more about Faith and Authenticity: Religion, Existentialism and the Human Condition (Gen Ed 1069)

    The Caribbean Crucible: Colonialism, Capitalism and Post-Colonial Misdevelopment In The Region (Gen Ed 1019)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Histories, Societies, Individuals icon with text

    Orlando Patterson

    This course explores the complex, formative role of the Caribbean in the development of Western colonialism and capitalism and the consequences for the peoples of the region. Four major themes will be examined. First, the importance of the region in the origin and early development of Western imperialism and capitalism: Why did both Western Europe and America begin their imperial and colonial expansion in this region and to what degree did the region’s slave based economies influence the nature and development of Western capitalism?... Read more about The Caribbean Crucible: Colonialism, Capitalism and Post-Colonial Misdevelopment In The Region (Gen Ed 1019)

    The Crusades and the Making of East and West (Gen Ed 1088)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Histories, Societies, Individuals icon with text

    Dimiter Angelov

    A series of wars in the later Middle Ages, the Crusades are one of the most significant and deeply symbolic events in human history. Marked by warfare and cross-cultural encounter between Christians and Muslims, they saw the first large-scale migration and colonization by Europeans before the Age of Discovery, the rise of the Italian merchant republics, and the solidification of religious and cultural identities across Europe and the Mediterranean.... Read more about The Crusades and the Making of East and West (Gen Ed 1088)

    American Dreams Made in Hollywood (Gen Ed 1043)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Aesthetics & Culture icon with text

    Eric Rentschler

    Is the so-called American dream dead? The notion once essentialized the grand promise of a better, fuller, and richer life. At the present moment, however, it seems to have lost its evocative power as a collective myth. In a time of national crisis and political emergency, this General Education course has a pressing mission. It aims to further a dynamic understanding of American dreams (for there are many and not just one), to apprehend their complexities and contradictions, to appreciate their diverse manifestations and historical shapes, and above all to take measure of their meanings for the world we inhabit.... Read more about American Dreams Made in Hollywood (Gen Ed 1043)

    Permanent Impermanence: Why Buddhists Build Monuments (Gen Ed 1083)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Aesthetics & Culture icon with text

    Jinah Kim, Yukio Lippit, and Eugene Wang (on leave Fall 2019)

    Banner of Buddhism images

    Everything changes. This is, in its simplest and most fundamental formulation, one of the essential teachings of Buddhism. Buddhist communities throughout history have preached, practiced, and written about the ephemerality and illusoriness of our everyday lives and experiences.... Read more about Permanent Impermanence: Why Buddhists Build Monuments (Gen Ed 1083)

    Tech Ethics: AI, Biotech, and the Future of Human Nature (Gen Ed 1058)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Ethics & Civics icon with textScience & Technology in Society icon with text

    Michael Sandel and Doug Melton

    The course explores the moral, social, and political implications of new technologies. Will biotechnology and AI enable us to hack humanity? Should we edit the genes of our children, extend the human lifespan, and genetically enhance our athletic ability and IQ? Can algorithms be fair? Will robots make work obsolete? Can smart machines outthink us? In an age of big data and social media, is privacy over? Is democracy?... Read more about Tech Ethics: AI, Biotech, and the Future of Human Nature (Gen Ed 1058)

    Medical Ethics and History (Gen Ed 1116)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Ethics & Civics icon with textHistories, Societies, Individuals icon with text

    David Shumway Jones

    'The Doctor' painting by Luke Fildes

    Students will encounter the ethical dilemmas of medical practice throughout their lives, whether with their own health, or with the health their families and friends.  This course will equip them with the tools of moral philosophy so that they can recognize, critique, and craft arguments grounded in appeals to utilitarianism, deontology, or rights.... Read more about Medical Ethics and History (Gen Ed 1116)

    Multisensory Religion: Rethinking Islam Through the Arts (Gen Ed 1087)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Aesthetics & Culture icon with text

    Ali S. Asani

    One need only walk into a church, a mosque, a temple, a synagogue or any place of worship to experience the complexity, beauty and aesthetic power of religion through the senses. For millions of believers the world over, their experience of religion is not only—or even primarily—dictated by ideological teachings; it is forged through personal and private experiences, very often sensory in nature and embedded in the arts broadly defined.... Read more about Multisensory Religion: Rethinking Islam Through the Arts (Gen Ed 1087)

    Power and Civilization: China (Gen Ed 1136)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    Histories, Societies, Individuals icon with text

    William C. Kirby and Peter K. Bol

    How is a civilization built and sustained over millennia?  How are political systems supported or undermined by cultural, economic, and ecological challenges?  How does the need for shared values in a nation compete with individual interest and creativity?

    These concepts are common to humankind, but nowhere on Earth are they more in evidence than in the story of the longest, continuous civilization in human history, China, home to one-fifth of mankind.... Read more about Power and Civilization: China (Gen Ed 1136)

    Contemporary Developing Countries: Entrepreneurial Solutions to Intractable Problems (Gen Ed 1011)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    Histories, Societies, Individuals icon with text

    Tarun Khanna and Satchit Balsari

    What problems do developing countries face, and how can individuals contribute to solutions rather than awaiting the largesse of the state or other actors? Intractable problems – such as lack of access to education and healthcare, forced reliance on contaminated food, deep-seated corruption – are part of the quotidian existence of the vast majority of five of the world’s seven billion people.... Read more about Contemporary Developing Countries: Entrepreneurial Solutions to Intractable Problems (Gen Ed 1011)

    Medicine and Conflict: The History and Ethics of Healing in Political Turmoil (Gen Ed 1150)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    Ethics & Civics icon with text

    Soha Bayoumi

    “War is the only proper school for surgeons,” the Ancient Greek physician, Hippocrates, is quoted to have said. This saying has been used to show how medicine and war have been thought for millennia to shape each. Medicine has played a major role in situations of political conflict, ever since human societies engaged in war and started elaborating “just war doctrines,” that determine how belligerent parties should conduct war, as an attempt to “civilize” war and mitigate its scourges.... Read more about Medicine and Conflict: The History and Ethics of Healing in Political Turmoil (Gen Ed 1150)

    Stories from the End of the World (Gen Ed 1001)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    Aesthetics & Culture icon with text

    Giovanni Bazzana

    Fantasizing about the end of the world is something that many people in the US do on a daily basis either by watching their favorite shows on TV, by playing videogames, or by listening to political speeches. This course will start from this observation to ask why imagining the end is so pervasive in our culture and to analyze critically where these images are coming from and how they are used in contemporary conversations.... Read more about Stories from the End of the World (Gen Ed 1001)

    Texts in Transition (Gen Ed 1034)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    Histories, Societies, Individuals icon with text Aesthetics & Culture icon with text

    Ann Blair and Leah Whittington

    We live in a moment of “crisis” around regimes of preservation and loss. As our communication becomes ever more digital— and, therefore, simultaneously more ephemeral and more durable—the attitudes and tools we have for preserving our culture have come to seem less apt than they may have seemed as recently as a generation ago. This course examines how texts have been transmitted from the past to the present, and how we can plan for their survival into the future.... Read more about Texts in Transition (Gen Ed 1034)

Pages