Classes

    Anime as Global Popular Culture (Gen Ed 1042)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    What can anime’s development in Japan and its global dissemination teach us about the messy world of contemporary media culture where art and commerce, aesthetic and technology, and producers and consumers are inextricably entangled with each other?

     

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    Tomiko Yoda

    Banner of anime images

    In this course, students will learn to engage Japanese or Japanese-style animation (sometimes known as anime) through two-pronged approaches. First, the students will learn to evaluate the aesthetic and socio-cultural relevance of anime in relation to the criteria and perspectives developed through the study of more established artistic forms such literature, cinema and visual arts. We will cover topics including, anime’s generic conventions, formal aesthetic, and narrative motifs.... Read more about Anime as Global Popular Culture (Gen Ed 1042)

    Painting's Doubt: A Studio Course (Gen Ed 1114)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    How does a hands-on practice of image making (painting) lead us  to perceive, represent and inhabit our world differently?

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    Matt Saunders

    Paul Cezanne, unfinished painting of trees

    Painting is an engagement between the self and the world.  It is a practice of embodied making, and, as a language outside of words, can think around conditioned understanding.  This introductory studio art course proposes learning to paint as a new experience of relating to the world, and through painting we will investigate not only what we have to say, but what we have to see.... Read more about Painting's Doubt: A Studio Course (Gen Ed 1114)

    Power to the People: Black Power, Radical Feminism, and Gay Liberation (Gen Ed 1130)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    How does understanding political activists and movements in the past help us radically change the world today?

     

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    Michael Bronski

    This course is an introduction to the radical American social change movements of the 1960s and 70s. We will examine the specific historical conditions that allowed each of these movements to develop, the interconnections and contradictions among them, and why their political power faded, only to reemerge in new manifestations today.... Read more about Power to the People: Black Power, Radical Feminism, and Gay Liberation (Gen Ed 1130)

    Loss (Gen Ed 1131)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    How are we to cope with the inevitability that some of what we most love in life we will lose?

     

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    Kathleen Coleman

    Loss is an inevitable fact of human existence. Small losses most of us learn to bear with equanimity. But enormous, wrenching, life-changing losses open voids in our lives for which we can never feel adequately prepared, even if we can see them coming.... Read more about Loss (Gen Ed 1131)

    Faith and Authenticity: Religion, Existentialism and the Human Condition (Gen Ed 1069)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    How do the possibilities of faith and the demands of living authentically square with the developments of the modern west and its threats of nihilism?

     

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    Courtney Bickel Lamberth and David Lamberth

    This course engages some of the most fundamental questions of human existence through the philosophical, theological and literary works of 19th and 20th century authors many of whom are associated with the movement called “existentialism.” What is an authentic individual life?... Read more about Faith and Authenticity: Religion, Existentialism and the Human Condition (Gen Ed 1069)

    Act Natural (Gen Ed 1050)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    How do we draw the line between acting and authenticity?

     

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    David Levine

    "To thine own self be true,” runs the famous line in Hamlet. But which self? And why? And who’s judging? Does this injunction to be authentic even make sense today, when profiles proliferate online and surveillance is ubiquitous?... Read more about Act Natural (Gen Ed 1050)

    Mental Health and Mental Illness through Literature and the Arts (Gen Ed 1144)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    How have mental illness and mental health been understood across time and space, and how have literature and the arts both perpetuated and undermined stigmas against individuals with mental illness?

     

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    Karen Thornber

    Mental health experts believe that globally, more than 1 billion people have a mental illness.  And yet the biases and misperceptions surrounding mental illness, not to mention the dehumanization and abuse in many communities of individuals with a mental illness, remains acute.  This course uses literature and the arts to help students learn about more about some of the prevalent biases/misperceptions/myths/stigmas against individuals with mental illness and how these biases can be (or in the past have been) ameliorated.... Read more about Mental Health and Mental Illness through Literature and the Arts (Gen Ed 1144)

    The Ancient Greek Hero (Gen Ed 1074)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    How did ancient Greek heroes, both male and female, learn about life by facing what all us have to face, our human condition?

     

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    Gregory Nagy

    How to face death? Concentrating on this central human question, we will explore some of the greatest works of ancient Greek literature in English translation. For the Greeks, a special way to address the problem of death was to think long and hard about what they called "heroes" in their myths.... Read more about The Ancient Greek Hero (Gen Ed 1074)